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What is an Inland Port?

FS-Industrial 457x296
Published: Jun 10, 2019
Inland ports are specialized locations developed to serve the intermodal transportation network. Intermodal in this sense are about containers that are on a truck chassis, train or ship. Ordinarily located along railroad lines, inland ports offer intermodal transfer facilities (from ship and / or train to truck) and frequently international trade processing and other services and may be linked to specific seaports. Distribution centers and other warehousing are generally collocated with inland ports, even on site. Inland Ports are set-up to be a hub for freight moving to facilities, such as production plants and distribution centers, which are regionally located near the inland port.

Short haul rail allows shippers to avoid the long, costly truck miles to and from the marine terminal and reduce the unproductive hours when truckers are waiting to pick-up their load. In addition, shippers achieve operational flexibility at their facilities since the inland port is open for business 24/7. An example would be Jacksonville to the CSX ILC in Winter Haven. When a company is located near an inland port, they’re able to order a container the day they need it, and quickly return them without incurring accessorial charges, such as chassis and detention costs.

An ongoing driver shortage; new regulations that limit a driver’s time on the road, such as ELDs (electronic logging devices); as well as spikes in demand due to larger and larger vessels have resulted in an increase in trucking costs and the inability to get timely trucking services. An Inland Port addresses a number of issues facing the distribution and trucking industries. Call me to learn how an inland port location would benefit your business.

Contact Franklin Street with your industrial real estate questions. Larry.Kahn@FranklinSt.com or 407.458.5419

Credit: Laurence Kahn
Source: Franklin Street
URL: https://franklinst.com/